M22, or Messier 22, is a bright globular cluster in the constellation of Sagittarius that is readily visible in binoculars in the summer sky. The dense star cluster is one of the nearest of the roughly 150 globular clusters surrounding the Milky Way. M22 was the first globular cluster ever discovered, back in 1665. I took this photo with a TMB92L refractor telescope, an unmodified Canon T3i DSLR camera, and a Celestron CG-4 mount equipped with a tracking motor. 

The Orion Nebula in the constellation of Orion, otherwise known as M42/M43. The Orion Nebula is the brightest nebula visible in the Northern Hemisphere. Even under moderately light polluted skies, the nebula is visible to the naked eye as a faint cloud below the three stars forming Orion's belt, at the tip of the constellation's "sword." In this image, you can also make out the so-called Running Man Nebula, named after its resemblance to a jogger mid-stride.

The Milky Way as seen from within the rock formations at the Paint Mines Open Space in Calhan, Colorado, about 30 miles east of Colorado Springs. I took this photo using a Canon 70D DSLR camera a Rokinon HD8M-C 8mm f/3.5 HD fisheye lens. This image consists of two exposures, one long exposure for the Milky Way itself, and a second, light painted shot of the rock formations. 

I love the sight of the moon during the day. I captured this image with a Canon 70D DSLR camera and a TMB92L refractor telescope.

The fall Milky Way as seen from within the rock formations at Paint Mines Open Space in Calhan, Colorado. This image is a composite of two photos taken with a Canon 70D and a Rokinon HD8M-C 8mm f/3.5 HD fisheye lens, one of the the Milky Way and a second, light painted shot of the foreground. 

I took this photo on July 18, 2015, just after sunset from the Paint Mines Open Space in Calhan, Colorado. You can see the crescent moon just above the horizon, Jupiter in the upper middle, and Venus in the upper-left corner. I took this photo with a Canon 70D DSLR camera and Sigma AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 APO DG telephoto lens.

This is my second ever photo of the Andromeda Galaxy and my first through a telescope, taken back in April 2014. (My first picture was with a 300mm telephoto lens.)

I took this photo with a TMB92L refractor telescope, an unmodified Canon T3i DSLR camera, an Orion SSAG autoguider and 50mm guidescope, all riding on a Celestron AVX mount. All told, from telescope setup time to final processing, this photo took roughly eight hours to produce. 

I took this shot from the foothills of Cheyenne Mountain, near the entrance of the NORAD Cheyenne Mountain complex, looking east towards Colorado Springs, with a Canon 70D and a Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX lens.

My first-ever image of Mars, this photo was taken back in 2014 during the red planet's opposition that year, when it was on the same side of the sun as the Earth and therefore closest to our planet. I took this photo using a Celestron C6 SCT telescope, a 2.5x Televue PowerMate, an ASI120MC planetary/lunar imaging camera, all riding on a Celestron AVX mount.

I stayed up the entire night on April 15, 2014, to photograph the total lunar eclipse from beginning to end. This was the second lunar eclipse I ever photographed, the first being back in 2010.

I made this animation using 13 photos taken with a Canon T3i DSLR camera through a TMB 92L refractor telescope.