Taken around midnight last week in Karval, Colorado, near the reservoir, a really dark site that ranks as a Class 2 site on the Bortle Scale, located about an hour and a half east of Colorado Springs.

Besides the Milky Way, you can see Jupiter rising above the horizon, and a shooting star in the upper left. The three lights on the horizon are the towns of Pueblo, La Junta, and Trinidad, all in southeast Colorado.

I used a Canon 6D DSLR camera and a Rokinon 14mm F2.8 ultra wide lens.

Last night, my wife and I ventured east to Karval, Colorado, located in the high plains about an hour and a half from Colorado Springs, to the Karval Reservoir. This was our first time shooting in Karval, and we were impressed with how dark and desolate the area is. Other than a few cattle farms, it's surrounded by nothing but endless plains. We walked around the reservoir while we waited for the Milky Way to rise, and then began taking pics around midnight.

Last night was new moon, and the perfect occasion to get a shot of the Milky Way rising around midnight. The red lights in this photo are from a nearby wind farm. The green in the sky is an atmospheric phenomenon known as "airglow". I took this photo with a Canon 6D DSLR camera and a Rokinon 14mm F2.8 ultra wide lens.

This is my best-ever photo of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) and its two companion galaxies (M32 and M110), taken back in September 2014, from the Paint Mines Open Space in Calhan, Colorado. I took this photo with a TMB92L refractor telescope, a Hutech-modified Canon T3i DSLR camera, an Orion SSAG autoguider and 50mm guidescope, all riding on a Celestron AVX mount. All told, from telescope setup time to final processing, this photo took roughly twelve hours to produce. 

Another shot of the Milky Way from the Paint Mines Open Space in Calhan, Colorado, last night, my favorite and most visited site for photographing our galaxy. I light painted the foreground with an iPhone and blended it with a second exposure of the sky. This shot was taken with a Canon 6D DSLR camera with a Rokinon FE14M-C 14mm F2.8 Ultra Wide Lens.

After having not imaged the Milky Way all summer, I went to the Paint Mines Open Space in Calhan, Colorado, last night, determined to get a photo before the core sets for the year. Here is our home galaxy rising above two hoodoos in the Paint Mines. Interestingly, we ran into another Milky Way photographer already set up in the park. He wasn't sure how to get into the rockier sections of the Paint Mines, so we all went together and ended up spending a couple hours imaging together.

I took this photo of Saturn and four of its moons back in 2013, when I lived in Arkansas, on a night of incredible seeing. I captured this image by taking two exposures, one for the planet and a second for the moons, and then combining them into a single composite shot. I used a Celestron C6 SCT telescope on a CG-4 mount and an ASI120MC planetary/lunar imaging camera.

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The largest sunspot in 24 years occurred in late October 2014. I managed to photograph it on October 27, 2014, using a Canon T3i DSLR camera and TMB92L refractor telescope equipped with a white light filter. The sunspot is comparable to Jupiter in size. A sunspot is a cooler area on the surface of the sun caused by fluctuating magnetic fields. 

Here is the Milky Way, our home galaxy, as seen from a field near the Paint Mines Open Space in Calhan, Colorado. I took this long exposure photo with a Canon 70D DSLR camera and a Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX lens.

M51, popularly known as the Whirlpool Galaxy, is a face-on spiral galaxy in the constellation of Canes Venatici. A smaller galaxy, NGC 5195, can be seen interacting with it as the two galaxies pass each other, tidally interacting and distorting one of the spiral arms of M51. Both galaxies lie more than 31 million light-years from our own galaxy. I took this image with a TMB92L refractor telescope, a Hutech-modified Canon T3i DSLR, a Orion SSAG autoguider and 50mm guidescope, all on a Celestron AVX mount.