The Orion Nebula in the constellation of Orion, otherwise known as M42/M43. The Orion Nebula is the brightest nebula visible in the Northern Hemisphere. Even under moderately light polluted skies, the nebula is visible to the naked eye as a faint cloud below the three stars forming Orion's belt, at the tip of the constellation's "sword." In this image, you can also make out the so-called Running Man Nebula, named after its resemblance to a jogger mid-stride.

The Lagoon Nebula, otherwise known as Messier 8, a bright emission nebula in the constellation of Sagittarius. The brightest nebula visible in the summer, the Lagoon Nebula can just be seen with the naked eye under dark skies and is easy to spot with a small pair of binoculars. I took this photo with a TMB92L refractor telescope, a Hutech-modified Canon T3i DSLR, an Orion SSAG autoguider and 50mm guidescope, all riding on a Celestron AVX mount.

The Dumbbell Nebula (M27), a planetary nebula located in the summer constellation Vulpecula. A striking sight through even a small telescope. I took this picture using a TMB92L refractor telescope, a Hutech-modified Canon T3i DSLR, an Orion SSAG autoguider and 50mm guidescope, all riding on a Celestron AVX mount.

I took this photo of the Pleiades in January, 2014, from the moderately light polluted skies of Fayetteville, Arkansas, using a TMB92L refractor telescope, a Canon T3i DSLR, an Orion SSAG autoguider and 50mm guidescope, on a  Celestron AVX mount.The Pleiades are one of my favorite objects in the night sky. They look best through binoculars, which frame the cluster nicely and show off its cool blue stars. The nebulae surrounding the Pleiades is only visible through long-exposure photography. The cluster is also known as M45, the Seven Sisters, and Subaru.