I took this photo of Saturn and four of its moons back in 2013, when I lived in Arkansas, on a night of incredible seeing. I captured this image by taking two exposures, one for the planet and a second for the moons, and then combining them into a single composite shot. I used a Celestron C6 SCT telescope on a CG-4 mount and an ASI120MC planetary/lunar imaging camera.

My first-ever image of Mars, this photo was taken back in 2014 during the red planet's opposition that year, when it was on the same side of the sun as the Earth and therefore closest to our planet. I took this photo using a Celestron C6 SCT telescope, a 2.5x Televue PowerMate, an ASI120MC planetary/lunar imaging camera, all riding on a Celestron AVX mount.

This animation of Jupiter and its closest moon Io consists of 10 frames captured between 9:13pm and 10:13pm on February 11th, 2014, I took with a Celestron C6 SCT telescope on a Celestron AVX mount, using a 2x Barlow and a ASI120MC planetary/lunar imaging camera. A day on Jupiter is only 10 hours, so it's possible to capture its rotation across multiple images taken in a short amount of time.

Saturn and four of its moons on May 7th, 2013. I took this photo using a Celestron C6 SCT telescope and and an ASI120MC planetary/lunar imaging camera.

This is my best ever image of Jupiter, taken in February 2014 in Fayetteville, Arkansas on a night of incredible seeing. If you look closely, you can see Jupiter's volcanic moon Io to the right of the planet. Taken with a Celestron C6 SCT, Celestron AVX mount, a 2x Barlow, and a ASI120MC planetary/lunar imaging camera.